While I think that your initial response to Phillip’s suggestion about design was a little too strong, Dasjung, I’ve got to chime in here and observe that Phil, ThunderCock and Dumbass, by resorting to name calling and simplistic reasoning, come across as very lacking in both decorum and sensitivity.  If a guy wants to expect, even demand, high quality in his field of choice, I beleive he has a right, if not a responsibility, to do so!  Also, Dumbass, be careful who you call Dumbass. You just show YOUR true colors by doing so. 

If you live in an area where Uber or Lyft operate, why not become a driver? If you're looking to make some short-term cash, you can definitely rake it in by working for one of these popular car-hire apps. As long as your vehicle fits within the specifications of their program, and you have a clean license, you could do this on the side, especially if you're in a crunch for cash.


It shows your true ignorance by calling someone an idiot. In no way was this thread used to alienate anyone, but merely having a heated discussion of professions and their importance. If you didn’t read my comment correctly, I said…”for example.” I know the difference between graphic design and being a surgeon. Those of you who are obviously majorly left-brained will never understand the creative industry. You’re right, anyone can be a bad designer, or a bad surgeon, or a bad accountant coordinator…etc. That’s why there exists terrible brand identities, malpractice suits, etc as well. All I was saying that the creative industry shouldn’t be held below the threshold of what is real and what is a fake profession. All professions should be respected in their own right. Period.
Mechanical Turk is Amazon's take on micro-jobs. These are small miniscule-jobs that you can do for other people, which they call HITs, or Human Intelligence Tasks. These are super simple tasks that anyone can do. Some examples are listing off some URLs with certain kinds of images for one cent, or recording a few phrases with a microphone for 6 cents.
Buy bottled water in bulk at Costco or Sam’s Club and sell it for a dollar where there are a ton of people: parks, festivals, concerts, etc. People are crazy for bottled water and this is a little summertime gig that can bring in more money than you’d think on a hot sunny afternoon. Here’s a bonus tip: give some of your proceeds to a charity you care about or that you know will resonate with people. In doing so, you’re bottled water business isn’t all about your profit. You’re helping better our world and also provide a thirsty person some water to drink.

Try flipping houses if you have experience with making home repairs. As you may know from watching popular home improvement shows, flipping homes involves buying up a lower valued property that needs work, and then fixing it up for resell. To get started, you’ll need to have financing either through a bank a partner. Then, you can buy a property that’s priced below market value. After you renovate the property, you may be able to sell it for a profit.[10]
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